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USS Holland AS-32 Association
The Official Homeport for All Crewmembers of the
World Greatest Tender in the U.S. Navy
Awards, Citations, and Campaign Ribbons
Meritorious Unit Citation (4), Battle Efficiency "E"(10), National Defense, Humanitarian Service (2)

Silent Service



No one has done more to prevent conflict -
no one has made a greater sacrifice for the cause for peace
- than you, America's proud Missile Submarine Family.
You stand Tall among our Heroes of the Cold War."
 General Colin Powell




   
This Page is dedicated to those "Boats" that the USS Holland Serviced during
her time of service to the U.S.Navy.
 

Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine

Ballistic missile submarines (SSBNs or boomers in American slang) carry submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBMs) with nuclear warheads for attacking strategic targets such as cities or missile silos anywhere in the world. They are currently universally nuclear-powered to provide the greatest stealth and endurance.(The first Soviet ballistic missile submarines were diesel-powered) They played an important part in Cold War mutual deterrence, as both the United States and the Soviet Union had the credible ability to conduct a retaliatory strike against the other nation in the event of a  first strike. This comprised an important part of the strategy of Mutual Assured Destruction.

         

 
Peace thru Brute Force
 
POLARIS

        Named for the North Star, is a two-stage ballistic missile, powered by solid fuel rocket motors and guided by a self-contained inertial guidance system independent of external commands or control. The Polaris program started development in 1956. The USS George Washington, the first US missile submarine, successfully launched the first Polaris missile from a submerged submarine on July 20, 1960. The A-2 was essentially an upgraded A-1 and entered service in late 1961; it was fitted on a total of 13 submarines and served until June 1974.(1). Ongoing problems with the W-47 warhead, especially with its mechanical arming and safing equipment, led to large numbers being recalled for modifications, and the U.S. Navy sought a replacement with either a larger yield or equivalent destructive power. The result was the W-58 warhead used as a 'cluster' of three for Polaris A-3, the final model. This replaced the earlier A-1 and A-2 in the US Navy and equipped the British Polaris force. The A-3 had a range extended to 2,500 nautical miles (4,630 km) and a new weapon bay housing three Mk 2 re-entry vehicles (ReB or Re-Entry Body in US Navy and British usage); and the new W-58 warhead of 200kT yield. This arrangement was originally described as a 'cluster warhead' but was replaced with the term Multiple Re-Entry Vehicle (MRV). The three warheads were spread about a common target and were not independently targeted. The three warheads were stated to be equivalent in destructive power to a single one megaton warhead. Later A-3 missiles (but not the ReBs) were also given limited hardening to protect the missile electronics against electromagnetic pulse effects while in the boost phase. This was known as the A-3T ("Topsy") and was the final production model. The USN had forward-basing arrangements for its Atlantic-based Polaris fleet with both the United Kingdom and Spain permitting the use of bases at the Holy Loch in Scotland and at Rota in the Bay of Cadiz that were much closer to patrol areas, avoiding the necessity for lengthy transit times from U.S. East Coast bases. This forward-basing arrangement was continued when Poseidon replaced Polaris. Polaris was not accurate enough to destroy hardened targets but would have been effective against dispersed surface targets, such as airfields, radar and SAM sites, as well as military and industrial centers of strategic importance. The military authorities, however, regarded Polaris as but one of a team of players, each with its own function. The task allotted to Polaris of 'taking out' peripheral defenses was well-suited to its characteristics and limitations.

 
POSEIDON

        The Navy's Strategic Systems Program Office directed production of the POSEIDON C3 missile, an improved version of the POLARIS, to maximize the effectiveness of the Navy's FBM weapon system as a deterrent to the outbreak of nuclear war. POSEIDON, which had its roots in POLARIS technology, was a two-stage, solid propellant missile capable of being launched from a submerged FBM submarine. It was only 2 feet longer than the 32-foot POLARIS A3 missile, but had a much larger diameter, 74 versus 54 inches, and was 30,000 pounds heavier. Despite this increase in size, the growth potential of the FBM submarines allowed POSEIDON missiles to fit into the same 16 missile launch tubes that carried POLARIS. POSEIDON was also a 2500 nautical (2880 statute) mile range missile; however, it was outfitted with multiple warheads, each of which could be targeted separately. This capability, known as MIRV, enabled POSEIDON to cover an increasing number of targets. The POSEIDON missile was deployed on 31 of the Navy's 41 FBM submarines. (The first 10 FBM submarines to be built, including the 5 GEORGE WASHINGTON Class and the 5 ETHAN ALLEN Class, were not retrofitted to POSEIDON.) Of the 31 POSEIDON FBM submarines, 12 were backfitted to carry the TRIDENT I (C4) missile. The first launch of a POSEIDON missile from a submerged submarine was successfully conducted on 3 August 1970. The missile was launched from USS JAMES MADISON (SSBN 627) as she cruised submerged off the coast of Florida near Cape Canaveral. The POSEIDON C3 became operational on 31 March 1971, when USS JAMES MADISON (SSBN 627) began her initial operational patrol carrying 16 tactical POSEIDON C3 missiles. With MADISON's deployment, the POSEIDON missile was introduced into the nation's arsenal of operational deterrent weapons and brought to successful fruition the development program that was announced in January 1965 as a successor weapon system to POLARIS. All U.S. POSEIDON SSBNs have terminated their strategic mission. The last POSEIDON SSBN offloaded 16 September 1992

 
TRIDENT
(Note : Trident was not on the USS Holland's Arsenal supply stock for submarines.)

      TRIDENT, the popular name given to the next sea-based strategic weapon system, stems from Roman mythology. Trident II D-5 is the sixth generation member of the U.S. Navy's Fleet Ballistic Missile (FBM) program which started in 1956. Systems have included the Polaris (A1), Polaris (A2), Polaris (A3), Poseidon (C3), and Trident I (C4). The first deployment of Trident II was in 1990 on the USS Tenessee (SSBN 734). While Trident I was designed to the same dimensions as the Poseidon missile it replaced, Trident II is a little larger.Using advanced technology in propellants, electronics, and other materials, the TRIDENT I (C4) missiles have a much greater range than POSEIDON, carrying a full payload to a range of 4000 nautical (4600 statute) miles and a reduced payload to even greater ranges. The TRIDENT I (C4) missile is a three-stage, solid propellant, inertially guided, submarine launched missile. It has a range and payload greater than the POSEIDON missile, thus providing a several-fold increase in the operational area of the U.S. submarine fleet. The C4 is deployed in the new TRIDENT submarine. In addition, one of the C4 design requirements was the capability to be backfitted into the then existing POSEIDON submarines. The first tactical patrol of a backfitted POSEIDON submarine was in October 1979, and the first TRIDENT submarine deployed in September 1982 from Bangor, WA. The TRIDENT/OHIO Class SSBNs are quieter, more capable, and more difficult to detect than their predecessors, the POSEIDON Class SSBNs. The TRIDENT II (D5) is a three-stage, solid propellant, inertially guided missile. TRIDENT II (D5) is launched underwater from the OHIO Class of nuclear-propelled TRIDENT submarines, each of which has 24 launch tubes. The TRIDENT II and its predecessor TRIDENT I have ranges of more than 4000 nautical miles (4600 statute miles). TRIDENT II is more sophisticated, with a significantly greater payload capability. The ten Trident submarines in the Atlantic fleet were initially equipped with the D-5 Trident II missile. The eight submarines in the Pacific were initially equipped with the C-4 Trident I missile. In 1996 the Navy started to backfit the eight submarines in the Pacific to carry the D-5 missile.

   
  Cut Away View of A Ohio Class SSBN  Click Sub pin for link    
 41 for Freedom

The George Washington class of United States Navy submarine were the first ballistic missile submarines in the world. Together with the Ethan Allen, the Lafayette, the James Madison, and the Benjamin Franklin classes, they comprised the "41 for Freedom." The December 1959 commissioning of George Washington (SSBN-598), the class's lead ship, gave the United States a stealth platform with enormous nuclear firepower, a powerful deterrant and weapon in the Cold War.

The United States Navy ordered a class of nuclear-powered submarines armed with long-range strategic missiles on 31 December 1957, and tasked Electric Boat with converting two existing attack submarine hulls to ballistic missile-carrying boats to quickly create the deterrant force. To accomplish this conversion, Electric Boat persuaded the Navy in January 1958 to slip the launch dates for two Skipjack-class fast attack submarines, the just-begun Scorpion (SSN-589) and the not-yet-started Sculpin (SSN-590). On 12 February 1958, President of the United States Dwight D. Eisenhower signed funding for three ballistic missile submarines.

The George Washingtons were essentially Skipjacks with a 130-foot missile compartment ("Sherwood Forest"), inserted between the ship's control navigation areas and the nuclear reactor compartment. In the case of the lead ship, George Washington (SSBN-598), that is literally the case: the keel already laid by Electric Boat at Groton, Connecticut for Scorpion was cut apart and extended to become the keel for George Washington. Then Electric Boat and Mare Island Naval Shipyard began construction of one other boat each from extended plans.

 
Links to the Submarines that The Holland Serviced
  U.S.S. Ethan Allen

USS Ethan Allen (SSBN-608), lead ship of her class, was the second ship of the United States Navy to be named for Ethan Allen. Her keel was laid down by the Electric Boat Corporation of Groton, Connecticut. She was launched on 22 November 1960, sponsored by Mrs. Robert H. Hopkins, great-great-great-granddaughter of Ethan Allen. The ship was commissioned on 8 August 1961, with Commander Paul L. Lacy, Jr., commanding Blue Crew and Commander W. W. Behrens, Jr., commanding the Gold Crew. On 6 May 1962, Ethan Allen, under the command of Captain Paul Lacy and with Admiral Levering Smith aboard, launched a nuclear-armed Polaris missile that detonated at 11,000 feet (3.4 km) over the South Pacific. That test (Frigate Bird), part of Operation Dominic I, was the only complete operational test of an American strategic missile. The warhead hit "right in the pickle barrel."

SSBN 608
 
USS Thomas A. Edison USS Thomas A. Edison (SSBN-610), an Ethan Allen-class ballistic-missile submarine, was the second ship of the United States Navy to be named for the inventor, Thomas Edison. Her keel was laid down on 15 March 1960 by the Electric Boat Division of the General Dynamics Corporation of Groton, Connecticut. She was launched on 15 June 1961 sponsored by Mrs. Madeleine Edison Sloane, and commissioned on 10 March 1962 with Captain Charles M. Young commanding the Blue Crew and Captain Walter Dedrick commanding the Gold CrewIn 1981, in compliance with the SALT I treaty, the missile section of Thomas A. Edison was decommissioned. Cement blocks were placed in the missile tubes, the missile fire control system was removed as was one of the ship's inertial navigation systems.
SSBN-610
 
U.S.S. Lafayette

USS Lafayette (SSBN-616), the lead ship of her class of ballistic missile submarine, was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named to honor Marquis de Lafayette, a French military hero who fought with and significantly aided the American Army during the American Revolutionary War. Her keel was laid down on 17 January 1961 by the Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics in Groton, Connecticut. She was launched 8 May 1962, sponsored by First Lady of the United States Jacqueline Kennedy, wife of the 35th President of the United States, and commissioned 23 April 1963 at Groton, Connecticut, with Commander P. J. Hannifin in command of the Blue Crew and Commander James T. Strong in command of the Gold Crew

SSBN 616
 
 
U.S.S. Alexander Hamilton USS Alexander Hamilton (SSBN-617), a Lafayette-class ballistic missile submarine, was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named for Alexander Hamilton (1755–1804), the first Secretary of the Treasury, who was instrumental in the formation of both the United States Coast Guard and the United States Navy. Her Keel was laid down on 26 June 1961 at Groton, Connecticut, by the Electric Boat Division of the General Dynamics Corporation. She was launched on 18 August 1962 sponsored by Mrs. Valentine Hollingsworth, Jr., the great-great-great granddaughter of Alexander Hamilton, and commissioned on 27 June 1963 with Commander Norman B. Bessac commanding the Blue Crew and Commander Benjamin F. Sherman, Jr., commanding the Gold Crew.
SSBN-617
 
U.S.S. Andrew Jackson

USS Andrew Jackson (SSBN-619), a Lafayette-class nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine, was the second ship of the United States Navy to be named for Andrew Jackson (1767–1845), the seventh President of the United States. The contract to build her was awarded to Mare Island Naval Shipyard on 23 July 1960 and her keel was laid down on 26 April 1961. She was launched on 15 September 1962 sponsored by Mrs. Estes Kefauver, and commissioned on 3 July 1963, with Commander Alfred J. Whittle in command of the Blue Crew and Commander James B. Wilson in command of the Gold Crew. Following commissioning, the submarine sailed via the Panama Canal to the East Coast. 1October and 11 October, during shakedown training out of Cape Canaveral, Florida, she successfully launched Polaris A-2 missiles; and, on 26 October, she sent Polaris A-3X missiles into space in the first submerged launching of its type; and she repeated the feat on 11 November. Five days later and six days before his assassination, on 16 November 1963, President John F. Kennedy — embarked in USS Observation Island (EAG-154) — observed Andrew Jackson launch another Polaris A-2 missile from a point off Cape Canaveral and congratulated Comdr. Wilson and his crew for "impressive teamwork."

SSBN 619
 
 
   
U.S.S. James Monroe
SSBN 622
 
  USS Nathan Hale (SSBN 623) was the sixth Lafayette-class nuclear powered fleet ballistic missile submarine produced. Named for Captain Nathan Hale (1755–1776) who served most famously as a spy during the American Revolutionary War. The contract for her construction was awarded on 3 February 1961. Construction began on 2 October 1962 by the Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics in Groton, Connecticut. She was launched 12 January 1963, sponsored by the wife of Admiral George Whelan Anderson, Jr. and commissioned on 23 November 1963 in a subdued ceremony due to the assassination of President Kennedy the day before. She entered service on 21 May 1964, homeported in Charleston, South Carolina and performing deterrent patrols as a member of the Atlantic Fleet. She was originally outfitted with Polaris Missile System and in the 1970s underwent conversion to the Poseidon Missile System. By April, 1986, she had completed 69 Strategic Deterrent Patrols in the Atlantic.
U.S.S. Nathan Hale
SSBN 623
 
 

USS Henry Clay (SSBN-625), a Lafayette-class ballistic missile submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for Henry Clay (1777–1852), the American statesman and orator. She was launched on 30 November 1962 sponsored by Mrs. Green B. Gibson, and commissioned on 20 February 1964, with Commander Thomas A Bryce in command of the Blue Crew and Commander John C. Lewis in command of the Gold Crew. Henry Clay conducted shakedown off the coast of Florida beginning 28 February 1964. She completed her first submerged firing 6 April 1964 and returned to Newport News 29 May 1964. The submarine then sailed to her new home port, Charleston, S.C., and departed for her first deployment 17 August 1964. Joining America's strong and mobile deterrent force beneath the seas, she began her operations in the protection of the free world. By January 1967 she had completed 11 patrols as a ready and powerful deterrent to aggression.

U.S.S. Henry Clay
SSBN 625
 
 

USS Daniel Webster (SSBN-626), a Lafayette-class ballistic missile submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for Senator Daniel Webster (1782–1852).Webster was originally built with planes mounted above the hull near the bow, giving way to the submariner's nickname "Old Funny Fins". This unique configuration was an attempt to reduce the effect of porpoising, but they increased water resistance and lowered her overall speed. During her first overhaul, these unusual planes were removed and standard fairwater planes were installed

U.S.S. Daniel Webster
SSBN 626
 
USS James Madison (SSBN-627), the lead ship of her class of ballistic missile submarine, was the second ship of the United States Navy to be named for James Madison (1751–1836), the fourth President of the United States. The contract to build her was awarded to Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company in Newport News, Virginia on 20 July 1961 and her keel was laid down on 5 March 1962. She was launched on 15 March 1963 sponsored by Mrs. A.S. Mike Monroney, and commissioned on 28 July 1964, with Commander Joseph L. Skoog, Jr. in command of the Blue Crew and Commander James D. Kearny in command of the Gold Crew. After post-shakedown repairs and modification in November and December 1964, James Madison sailed for her first patrol 17 January 1965.
U.S.S. James Madison
SSBN 627
 
  USS Tecumseh (SSBN-628), a James Madison-class ballistic missile submarine, was the fourth ship of the United States Navy to be named for Tecumseh (c.1768–1813), the leader of the Shawnee people. The contract to build the ship was awarded to the Electric Boat Division of the General Dynamics Corporation in Groton, Connecticut on 20 July 1961. Originally, she was to have been named William Penn, and would have been the first Navy ship to bear that name, but was renamed on 11 April 1962. Tecumseh's keel was laid down on 1 June 1962. She was launched on 22 June 1963 sponsored by Mrs. Robert L.F. Sikes, and commissioned on 29 May 1964, with Commander Arnett B. Taylor in command of the Blue Crew and Commander Charles S. Carlisle in command of the Gold Crew Tecumseh was decommissioned and stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 23 July 1993. Ex-Tecumseh entered the Nuclear Powered Ship and Submarine Recycling Program in Bremerton, Washington, and on 1 April 1994 ceased to exist.
U.S.S. Tecumseh
SSBN 628
 
Link to USS Von Steuben (SSBN-632), a James Madison-class ballistic missile submarine, was the second ship of the United States Navy to be named for Baron Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben (1730–1794), the German army officer who served in the American Revolutionary War. The contract to build her was awarded to Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company in Newport News, Virginia on 20 July 1961 and her keel was laid down on 4 September 1962. She was launched on 18 October 1963 sponsored by Mrs. Fred Korth, and commissioned on 30 September 1964, with Commander John P. Wise in command of the Blue Crew and Commander Jeffrey C. Metzel in command of the Gold Crew. Von Steuben was decommissioned on 26 February 1994 and stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 26 February 1994. Ex-Von Steuben entered the Nuclear Powered Ship and Submarine Recycling Program in Bremerton, Washington, on 1 October 2000, and on 30 October 2001 ceased to exist.
U.S.S. von Steuben
SSBN 632
 
Link to USS Casimir Pulaski (SSBN-633), a James Madison-class ballistic missile submarine, was the second ship of the United States Navy to be named for Kazimierz Pułaski (1745–1779), a Polish General who served in the American Revolutionary War. The contract to build this ship was awarded to the Electric Boat Division of the General Dynamics Corporation in Groton, Connecticut on 20 July 1961 and her keel was laid down on 12 January 1963. She was launched on 1  February 1964 sponsored by Mrs. John A. Gronouski, Jr., and commissioned on 14 August 1964, with Captain R. L. J. Long in command of the Blue Crew and Commander Thomas B. Brittain, Jr., in command of the Gold Crew. Casimir Pulaski was decommissioned and stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 7 March 1994. Ex-Casimir Pulaski entered the Nuclear Powered Ship and Submarine Recycling Program in Bremerton, Washington,and on 21 October 1994 ceased to exist.
U.S.S. Casmir Pulaski
SSBN 633
 
 

USS Stonewall Jackson (SSBN-634), a James Madison-class ballistic missile submarine, was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named for General Thomas J. Jackson, CSA, though the earlier two were known simply as Stonewall. The contract to build her was awarded to Mare Island Naval Shipyard in Vallejo, Calif. on 21 July 1961 and her keel was laid down on 4 July 1962. She was launched on 30  November 1963 sponsored by Miss Julia Christian McAfee, and commissioned on 26 August 1964, with Commander John H. Nicholson in command of the Blue Crew and Commander Richard A. Frost in command of the Gold Crew. The fleet ballistic missile submarine (FBM) entered post-shakedown availability on 13 February 1965, then made final preparations at Bangor, Washington, for overseas movement. In April, she began her first strategic deterrent patrol.

U.S.S. Stonewall Jackson
SSBN 634
 
  USS Sam Rayburn (SSBN-635) was a James Madison-class ballistic missile submarine named for U.S. House Speaker Sam Rayburn (1882–1961).The contract to build her was awarded to Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company in Newport News, Virginia on 20 July 1961 and her keel was laid down on 3 December 1962. She was launched on 20 December 1963 sponsored by Mrs. S.E. Bartley & Mrs. W.A. Thomas, and commissioned on 2 December 1964, with Captain Oliver H. Perry, Jr., in command of the Blue Crew and Commander William A. Williams III in command of the Gold Crew. Sam Rayburn was decommissioned on 31 July 1989 and reclassified a moored training ship with hull classification symbol MTS-635.
U.S.S. Sam Rayburn
SSBN 635
 
  USS Nathanael Greene (SSBN-636), a James Madison-class ballistic missile submarine, was one of three ships of the United States Navy to be named for Major General Nathanael Greene, who served in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. Both ships of the name USS General Greene were also named for him. n 13 March 1986 Nathanael Greene ran aground in the Irish Sea, suffering severe damage to her rudder and ballast tanks. Deactivated while still in commission in May, she was decommissioned on 15 December and stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 31 January 1987. Nathanael Greene's grounding was the first serious accident involving an American nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine, but her removal from service allowed the United States to easily comply with the missile limits of the SALT II Treaty.O
USS Nathanael Greene
SSBN-636

Submarine Video Link
There are several video's in this page that you'll find very interesting about our sailors "down under"
patrol

 
Where Are They Now
Dismantling Nuclear Submarines
 
Decommissioning Of A Nuclear Submarine Dismantling Nuclear Submarines
 
Ship-Submarine Recycling Program Nuclear Powered Submarine Inactivation and Disposal in the U.S.  A Comparative Analysis.
 
Fast Attacks & Boomers : Submarines in the cold war
 
see photo here showing 114 reactor compartments in open-air storage
 
 

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